February 29, 2024

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The world’s first artificial meteor shower will take place in 2025 over Japan

The world’s first artificial meteor shower will take place in 2025 over Japan

You’d better start memorizing your wishes now, because in 2025 hundreds of shooting stars will rise into the sky – after being dropped from a satellite.

These will constitute the world’s first artificial meteor shower by space startup ALE, which is set to take place over Japan.

Shooting stars appear when Earth passes through a cloud of debris left in its orbit by comets and asteroids.

The particles emit light because they quickly heat up as they pass through the atmosphere at high speeds.

For this project, called “SKY CANVAS,” particles of meteorites repeating will be pinned to a satellite at an altitude of 250 miles (400 km), then shot over a defined area.

The world’s first artificial meteor shower is set to be carried out by space startup ALE over Japan

For this project, named

For this project, called “SKY CANVAS,” the particles will be pinned to a satellite at an altitude of 250 miles (400 km), then released over a designated area. Pictured: ALE-1 satellite

These metallic particles will be balls about 0.4 inch (1 cm) in diameter and a few grams in mass.

What is star photography?

Shooting stars are the appearance of meteorites — small pieces of dust or rock — passing through Earth’s atmosphere.

They emit light because they heat up quickly while traveling through the air at high speeds.

There are between six and ten “scattered” meteors each night throughout the year, but during “meteor showers” this increases dramatically.

Rains occur when the Earth passes through a large cloud of debris left in its orbit by comets and asteroids.

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The pea-sized balls contain a secret chemical formula that causes them to light up from the friction of re-entry, at speeds of up to five miles (8 kilometers) per second.

ALE says they will travel more slowly and shine longer than normal stars — up to ten seconds each.

It will be visible to stargazers within 125 miles (200 km).

The ingredients in the pellets can be altered to change the color of each bright streak, meaning a multicolored fleet of shooting stars can be created.

After about two years in orbit, the backpack-sized satellite will re-enter the atmosphere and disintegrate completely, preventing it from becoming space debris.

Not only will the light show be a viewing pleasure for stargazers, but it will also help gather data about the third layer of Earth’s atmosphere – the “mesosphere”.

This is not an easy area to study, as airships and planes cannot fly high enough to reach it, but it is too low to be observed by satellite.

But scientists will be able to gather information on wind speed and atmospheric composition by following the trajectory and light emission of artificial meteorites.

Engineers at ALE will be able to control the position, velocity, and timing of meteorite particles to help conduct experiments.

The pea-sized balls contain a secret chemical formula that causes them to light up from the friction of re-entry, at speeds of up to five miles (8 kilometers) per second.

The pea-sized balls contain a secret chemical formula that causes them to light up from the friction of re-entry, at speeds of up to five miles (8 kilometers) per second.

The team hopes the data will help inform weather models and, ultimately, increase our understanding of climate change.

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Another goal of the project, first announced in 2015, is to help spark greater interest in space and science in general.

“Our goal is to contribute to the sustainable development of humanity and bring space closer to us all, by expanding the area of ​​human activity beyond Earth to discover, collect and apply essential elements,” said Dr. Lena Okajima, Founder and CEO of ALE. data from space.

As a first step, I founded ALE to create the world’s first man-made shooting star, to inspire wonder and spark scientific curiosity.

Engineers at ALE will be able to control the position, velocity and timing of meteorite particles, to aid in experiments (artist's impression)

Engineers at ALE will be able to control the position, velocity and timing of meteorite particles, to aid in experiments (artist’s impression)

Another goal of the project, first announced in 2015, is to help inspire a greater interest in space and science in general (artist's impression)

Another goal of the project, first announced in 2015, is to help inspire a greater interest in space and science in general (artist’s impression)

“In the future, by combining critical climate research with a new form of space entertainment, we believe we can advance our scientific understanding of climate change while inspiring the curiosity and interest of people around the world about space and the universe.”

Those who wish to financially support the project will be able to do so by purchasing SKY CANVAS VIP PASS NFT.

This will allow access to online shows, and the chance to win an invitation to see a SKY CANVAS show in person.

These are not currently available, and their price has not been disclosed

Explanation: The difference between an asteroid, meteorite and other space rocks

that asteroid It is a large piece of rock left over from impacts or the early solar system. Most of them are located between Mars and Jupiter in the main belt.

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a comet It is a rock covered with ice, methane and other compounds. Their orbits take them far from the solar system.

a meteor It is what astronomers call a flash of light in the atmosphere as the debris burns.

This same wreck is known as a meteor. Most of it is so small that it just dries up in the atmosphere.

If any such meteorite reaches Earth, it is called a meteor.

Meteors, meteoroids, and meteoroids usually originate from asteroids and comets.

For example, if Earth passes through the tail of a comet, much of the debris burns up in the atmosphere, forming a meteor shower.