December 1, 2022

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The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs caused a “massive earthquake” that lasted for months

The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs caused a "massive earthquake" that lasted for months

Sure enough, the prehistoric Earth was rocky.

New research found it The asteroid that kills the dinosaurswhich struck Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula 66 million years ago, also caused a “massive earthquake” that shook the planet weeks to months after the impact, EurekAlert reported.

Upon impact of the 10-kilometre space rock, there was seismic activity estimated to be 50,000 times stronger than the devastating 9.1 earthquake that swept Sumatra, Indonesia, in 2004.

Geologist Herman Dario Bermudez — who has spent the past year across Texas, Alabama and Mississippi studying notable rock formations that still show faults and fissures likely from the extinction event — thinks this new set of data complements his findings from the Southern Hemisphere. in 2014.

There is new evidence pointing to long-term seismic activity from the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs.
Getty Images / istockphoto

While on Colombia’s Gorgonilla Island, Bermúdez found spherical deposits — also known as layers of rock with tiny glass grains — among more evidence of the massive earthquake. These granules were the result of heat and pressure from the asteroid melting into Earth after the impact, ejecting the molten blobs into the atmosphere, which landed back on the planet as glass due to gravity.

He also found fragments called “tektites” and “microtikites”, which were launched to Earth from the asteroid.

Stable Columbian rocks are thought to “tell a story from the ocean floor,” specifically about 2 kilometers deep. Bermudez found that layers of clay and sandstone millions of years old are still preserved in the current outcrop due to impact vibration.

New research has found that intense earthquakes shook the planet for weeks after the asteroid impact.
New research has found that intense earthquakes shook the planet for weeks after the asteroid impact.
Getty Images / istockphoto

“It’s one of the best preserved and was located deep in the ocean, so it wasn’t affected by the tidal waves,” he said.

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Just above those deposits, fern spores that indicated the first recovery of plant life after the asteroid impact were also preserved.

New research suggests that the prehistoric asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs also caused months of earthquakes.
New research suggests that the prehistoric asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs also caused months of earthquakes.
Getty Images / istockphoto

Bermúdez has also documented evidence of a large-scale tsunami that resulted from the impact.

Recently reported Flood waters have risen near space The entire planet was practically swamped upon replaying the “mile on altitude” effect.