July 24, 2024

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Kinky Friedman, an eccentric Texas singer-songwriter, has died at the age of 79

Kinky Friedman, an eccentric Texas singer-songwriter, has died at the age of 79

Kinky Friedman, the eccentric country singer-songwriter whose musings, novels, vignettes and gubernatorial run made him a folk hero, has died at age 79 at his home in Texas.

“Kinky Friedman rode the rainbow on his beloved Echo Hill surrounded by family and friends,” A statement On X his death announcement read. “Kinster has suffered tremendous pain and unimaginable loss in recent years, but he never lost his fighting spirit and quick wit. Kinky will live while his books are read and his songs are sung.

Friedman’s eccentric appeal and “bold Texas impudence,” as his friend Taj Mahal once described him, in each of his writings, speeches, songs, and interviews, cemented him as a media darling, songwriter, and friend of several presidents (George W. Bush). Bush, Bill Clinton) and considers Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson among his closest friends.

In 2006, Friedman campaigned for governor of Texas, receiving 12% of the vote. In 2014, Friedman said in one of his favorite phrases: “I have made my last will and testament. When I die, I will be cremated and my ashes will be placed in Rick Perry’s hair.”

Friedman’s most famous album, 1973 sold in america, He established the Chicago-born Jewish country singer as a rebel willing to test barriers, even among the outlaw country crowd of Nelson and Waylon Jennings who were country music contemporaries.

After a series of popular recording albums failed commercially, Friedman changed course and began a successful career as a novelist and eventually a columnist for Texas Monthlywhere his Texan column introduced readers across the country to his dark wit and slapstick pathos.

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After his death, Friedman’s estate published an excerpt from one of his 1993 columns, an essay about his lifelong devotion to animals: “They say when you die and go to heaven, all the dogs and cats you’ve ever had will come.” I’m running to meet you.”

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