TALQ Consortium to Extend Interface Standards to Smart City and IoT Applications

The TALQ Consortium has begun to expand the scope of its standards. The consortium previously developed a standardized interface for controlling a variety of streetlight systems within a single Central Management Software.  Now, the TALQ Consortium has initiated a program to establish standards for managing other Smart City and IoT (Internet of Things) applications. The consortium includes an extensive list of both large and small businesses that notably includes Philips, Osram, Cisco, and Zumtobel.

The TALQ Consortium set up a new Smart City ‘Requirements Workgroup’ to meet the demands of cities, software suppliers, and hardware manufacturers globally. The Smart City ‘Requirements Workgroup’ intends to extend the TALQ specification to support IoT interfaces for cities. According to the consortium, the decision to expand beyond lighting into other potential smart city and IoT standards will expand the reach of the consortium to new member companies, including businesses that are not in the lighting industry.

The consortium points out that cities can face many challenges on the way to becoming smart cities. These challenges can include ensuring that they adopt state-of-the-art technology when developing a wide array of public services ranging from outdoor lighting over parking areas and waste management to E-Mobility. A city must be able to envision services that it will continue to offer for decades.

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In addition to trying to foster competition and negotiate the best pricing, public purchasers prefer to invest in open systems that do not rely on a single company or technology. Such open systems ensure that solutions are truly future-proof. Interoperable solutions are the requirement for open systems

The consortium points out that leading cities are increasingly seeking interoperable solutions across their systems. For example, when lighting control platforms are integrated with sensor networks and traffic systems, interoperable interfaces for these varied applications are needed.

The TALQ Consortium goes back to 2012 when leading lighting industry players came together to develop an interoperable interface for connecting and managing heterogeneous street lighting networks from assorted hardware and software vendors. The consortium expects to certify its first TALQ-compliant systems in the second half of 2016. Now that the Outdoor Lighting Standard is nearly rolled out, the consortium’s Steering Committee recently decided to broaden its scope to define a standard interface for smart city applications.

“We will first analyze other emerging smart city interface standards and highlight why an adoption of the TALQ Specification promises benefits to cities,” explains Gerard Lokhoff, Secretary General of the TALQ Consortium. ”Our street lighting standard enables true interoperability and ensures long-term flexibility for cities. Now with extending the specifications to wider smart city solutions, we will make these benefits available for a much broader set of innovative applications and public services.”

which developed a standardized interface for controlling a variety of streetlight systems from a single Central Management Software, has begun to expand the scope of its standards. The consortium has initiated a program to establish interface standards for managing other Smart City and IoT (Internet of Things) applications. The consortium includes an extensive list of both large and small businesses including Philips, Osram, Cisco, and Zumtobel.

The TALQ Consortium set up a new Smart City ‘Requirements Workgroup’ to meet the needs of cities, software suppliers, and hardware manufacturers globally. According to the consortium, expanding the standards into Smart City and IoT applications will broaden the consortium’s reach to new member companies, including businesses that are not in the lighting industry.

The goal of a smart city is to offer a wide range of services using centrally managed, state-of-the-art technology to both save money and improve the lives residents.

The consortium points out that cities can face many challenges on the way to becoming smart cities. Cities attempting to transform into  smart cities must ensure that they adopt right state-of-the-art technology when developing a wide array of public services ranging from outdoor lighting over parking areas and waste management to E-Mobility. A city must be able to envision services that it will continue to offer for decades.

Ideally, the system should not rely on a single company or technology, but should be platform independent. In addition to trying to foster competition and negotiate the best pricing, public purchasers prefer to invest such open systems. These open systems require interoperable solutions to ensure that solutions are truly future-proof. For example, when smart cities integrate lighting control platforms with sensor networks and traffic systems, they need interoperable interfaces for these varied applications.

The TALQ Consortium goes back to 2012 when leading lighting industry players came together to develop an interoperable interface for connecting and managing heterogeneous street lighting networks from assorted hardware and software vendors. The consortium expects to certify its first TALQ-compliant systems in the second half of 2016. Now that the Outdoor Lighting Standard is nearly rolled out, the consortium’s Steering Committee recently decided to broaden its scope to define a standard interface for smart city applications.

“We will first analyze other emerging smart city interface standards and highlight why an adoption of the TALQ Specification promises benefits to cities,” explains Gerard Lokhoff, Secretary General of the TALQ Consortium. “Our street lighting standard enables true interoperability and ensures long-term flexibility for cities. Now with extending the specifications to wider smart city solutions, we will make these benefits available for a much broader set of innovative applications and public services.”